Pllek

KUNST, CULTUUR, EVENTS EN MEER
08 April 2017
UITVERKOCHT | MAORI HAKA WORKSHOP, WOMEN ONLY

UITVERKOCHT | MAORI HAKA WORKSHOP, WOMEN ONLY

Join us at Pllek for a Traditional M?ori Haka Workshop by Iritana Bristowe (originally from New Zealand, Aotearoa) and Kieran Bristowe-Timu (Ngati Porou, Nga Puhi, Te Atiawa)

Saturday, April 8, 2017
Women only
12.30 - 15.30
Online tickets: € 25,00
Facebook event for updates

(Saturday, April 22 for men & women combined, check out this event)

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WORKSHOP – HAKA INTRODUCTION
Together with my niece Kieran Bristowe-Timu (Ngati Porou, Nga Puhi, Te Atiawa) we offer a three-hour introduction into Maori culture, explored through haka. For anyone who is interested, we will guide you through authentic explanation, presentation, performance and understanding of Maori haka.

Haka expert, Inia Maxwell (Ngati Whakaue/Ngati Rangiwewehi) has often remarked “in every haka there is a message or a tribute to somebody, it’s a vehicle for us to be able to express ourselves". This workshop is designed to give all participants the opportunity to express yourselves through Maori culture.

Join us on at Pllek for our first offering catered to women on Saturday, April 8, 2017 and again on Saturday, April 22, 2017 – an alternative option for both men and women.


COURSE CONTENT
• Mihi, introductions and karakia (prayer and/or thanks giving’s)
• Brief overview of Maori culture and content of the day
• Presentation of haka from tutors (Iritana and Kieran)
• Breakdown of haka
• Performance of participants in groups
• Opportunity for participant(s) to lead haka
• Performance of haka as complete group
• Warm-down, overview of the day
• Introduction to Part II – teaser
• Closing and karakia

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INTRODUCTION (Nga Mihi)
My name is Iritana Bristowe, originally from New Zealand (Aotearoa). My ancestors trace (whakapapa) back through two of the largest tribes (iwi) in the Northern island of Aotearoa.
Through my father I whakapapa to Ngati Porou, and my mother to Nga Puhi.

BACKGROUND
Haka - a traditional M?ori war dance, usually before battle.
"Tuturu whakamaua kia tina! Haramai te toki - haumie, hui e, taiki e!" - An old Maori proverb (whakatauki) which can be used to describe what Haka means to me. This whakatauki can loosely translate to mean, "Can you feel the power of it with your own hands, wholeheartedly?"

Haka is not so much a challenge, but indeed a "collective frenzy, a united front to intimidates ones opponents... a feeling of one, where we are going into battle, and do not expect to come back alive" - Haka expert Inia Maxwell (Ngati Whakaue/Ngati Rangiwewehi).